The Science of SLEEP…

It’s that time again… the clocks will go back one hour on Sunday 25th October at 2 am!  Daylight Savings Time officially comes to an end. 

How do you remember which way the clocks go? An easy way to remember is to think of the seasons; in the Spring, the clocks ‘spring forward’ and in Autumn they ‘fall back’. This also marks the end of British Summer Time (BST)… which also means an extra hour in bed! 

With this change you might be looking forward to getting an extra hour of sleep at night – but the amount of rest you’ll get will depend in part on your sleep habits:

The deep sleeper… If you are the type of person who doesn’t wake up until your alarm clock rings, you might get some extra rest, but only if you continue to go to bed at your normal time every night. 

The early riser… If you are a morning person who tends to wake up without an alarm, you might get less than an extra hour of sleep. The reason is simple… it could take several days or more for your body’s internal clock to adjust to the change.

The body’s internal clock or circadian rhythms

“Circadian” means “about a day.” This is the body’s internal clock, which gradually becomes established during the first months of life, controls the daily ups and downs of biological patterns, including body temperature, blood pressure, and the release of hormones. Circadian rhythms make people’s desire for sleep strongest between midnight and early morning, but less mid-afternoon. 

When you sleep, you cycle between the REM and non-REM sleep stages:

REM: Dreaming sleep or REM sleep – this happens usually 90 minutes after you fall asleep. The first period of REM typically lasts 10 minutes. Your heart rate and breathing gets faster. During this stage of sleep, you could experience more intense dreams because your brain is more active.

Non-REM: Quiet sleep or non-REM sleep (non-rapid eye movement) is basically dreamless sleep. During this stage the breathing and heart rate are slow and regular, the blood pressure is low and the sleeper is relatively still. This is broken up in three stages with each stage becoming progressively deeper. 1

You’ll need to experience all stages of sleep in order to wake up fully rested.

After a good night’s sleep, the benefits can be felt not only in our body, but also in our mind. Sleep is essential for maintaining cognitive skills such as communicating well, remembering key information and being creative and flexible in thought. There is also a strong relationship between sleep and physical and mental health. Not getting enough sleep has a profound impact on our ability to function.  

At Nikken we know how important sleep is for Active Wellness and that’s why we’ve designed a range of products that work in harmony together to address just this. 

For cosy nights, the KenkoDream® Quilt is made from a natural, anti-bacterial, breathable cotton cover and contains ceramic fibres that not only help release excess heat, but also release a calming warmth to help maintain a constant temperature.  

The same ceramic fibres can be found in the limited edition Kenko Travel Comforter, a superlight versatile blanket that can be folded and zipped up after use into a neat portable size making it easy to store and giving it multiple uses not just for the bed but also as a blanket for the sofa, to be kept and used in the car and for when travelling. 

These products are just a couple that can be found in the Sleep and Rest & Relaxation range – visit www.nikken.com/eu/ for the full range.

Read our previous blog Good sleep promotes good health…2 for tips on how to create the perfect bedtime routine for a good night’s sleep.

See our OCTOBER SPECIAL OFFERS … selected rest and relaxation products to help you on your journey to a better sleep… https://bit.ly/3dCjXIN

  1. https://sleepcouncil.org.uk/advice-support/sleep-hub/sleep-matters/sleep-patterns/
  2. https://nikkeneurope.wordpress.com/2018/10/01/good-sleep-promotes-good-health/

19th October 2020

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